Menu

Load Testing Blog

Showing posts tagged “drupal”

Drupal: Caching and Database Scalability

Note: This is Part 4 of an ongoing series on Drupal performance and load testing. If you haven’t already, read the introduction.
Summary
We measured Drupal’s performance with respect to database size, demonstrating flat performance regardless of the size of the database.  We also got some good data demonstrating Drupal’s behavior with caching.
Procedure
We re-created our previous test platform: a stock Drupal installation on an Amazon Elastic Cloud m1.large instance with both the Alternative PHP Cache (APC) and Drupal’s built-in caching capabilities.  In this test, however, instead of scaling the number of simultaneous users, we instead held the test at 400 … Continue reading »

aiCache and Drupal: A Case Study

Note: This is Part 3 of an ongoing series on Drupal performance and load testing. If you haven’t already, read the introduction.

Optimizing Drupal: From Baseline Drupal to the Pantheon Drupal Platform

Note: This is Part 2 of an ongoing series on Drupal performance and load testing. If you haven’t already, read the introduction.
Summary
We measured Drupal’s performance with a naive and recommended configuration, and again using the Pantheon Drupal Platform, demonstrating a better than 15x improvement in performance.
Procedure
We created a Drupal installation on the Amazon Elastic Cloud, which allows us to start and customize Drupal in a matter of minutes.  For these tests we used Amazon’s “Large” 64bit instance, which corresponds roughly to a dual-core machine with 7.5 GB of memory.
Our baseline platform consisted of a stock Fedora Core 8 with … Continue reading »

Load Testing Drupal: Introduction

At Web Performance, we’re all about measuring and optimizing web applications.  This quarter we decided to test a variety of Drupal configurations, starting with the most basic (unpack the drupal tarball into /var/www and run) and collecting benchmarks with increasingly sophisticated systems using optimized LAMP stacks and even a dual-server caching configuration.
For our test scenario, we imagined that we had just started a small drupal-based blog when a popular website linked to one of our stories and directed massive traffic onto our server. These visitors read stories, followed interesting links, and posted comments of their own. We … Continue reading »

Resources

Copyright © 2018 Web Performance, Inc.

A Durham web design company

×

(1) 919-845-7601 9AM-5PM EST

Just complete this form and we will get back to you as soon as possible with a quote. Please note: Technical support questions should be posted to our online support system.

About You
What you Need